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Capturing the Imagination of Young Minds

National Autism Week

In school, children have been learning that we are all different, that we all have brains, and that we each interpret what our brain is telling us differently. Children understand that our brain is collecting information about the world around us all of the time.

  • It gets that information from our senses - what we can see, hear, touch, taste and smell.
  • The brain works out what all this means and then we react to all that information.

Of course, the messages are constantly changing as we move around or things change around us.

Children with autism get all of that information, but they are not able to make sense of it all.

  • Their ears hear normally, but their brain cannot understand what others are saying. Sometimes, sounds that we like are far too loud to them.
  • Their eyes see normally, but some things seem to hurt their eyes, and some things seem to be very interesting.
  • Sometimes they are so interested in looking at something that they do not notice what else is going on around them.

  • It is hard for that person to learn to communicate and to understand what is happening in the world around them.

 

About 1 in 100 children have some difficulties with communication and interactions with other people which fit into the diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder. Only a few of them have severe problems.

here are two videos that can support your child to understand Autism - look them up on YouTube.

Amazing things happen - KS1

BBC My autism and me - KS2

 

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